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Proving an Unsuccessful Work Attempt

Proving an Unsuccessful Work Attempt

Individuals who have had an unsuccessful work attempt (UWA) may have an easier time getting approved for Social Security disability benefits. An unsuccessful work attempt could show the Social Security Administration (SSA) that you are disabled to the point that you are unable to continue or return to working.

According to the SSA, a UWA means you tried going back to work and were ultimately unable to perform the functions of your job due to your disability. You may work for up to six months before deciding whether your attempt to rejoin the workforce was unsuccessful. Once that period of work is deemed unsuccessful, you may then be found eligible for back paid benefits to cover that period of time.

What Qualifies as an Unsuccessful Work Attempt?

You must be unemployed for a significant period of time before trying to attempt work again. In other words, you must have a significant break in your working history to have a qualified UWA. Additionally, the work that you are claiming is unsuccessful must have lasted no more than six months. If the work lasted longer than a six-month period, that attempt to rejoin the workforce would not be considered unsuccessful by the SSA – even if you had to stop working because of your disability.

Proving an Unsuccessful Work Attempt

Anyone trying to prove that they had a UWA needs to provide evidence that their job lasted less than six months and that any special accommodations needed to work were removed. One of our experienced attorneys can walk you through the process of proving an unsuccessful work attempt and ensure all the required documentation is submitted to the SSA. Filing for Social Security disability benefits can be very confusing and complex, so contact our office to see how we can help.

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Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law

Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law
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